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Archive for the ‘Cheese’ Category

1867 – Joy Road

05.25.13

Joy RoadOn a recent [amazing] trip down to the Slow Food Canada national meeting, I happened to end up in a restaurant for dinner in Penticton, Cam and Dana happened to be there as well, and the restauranteur happened to introduce us. They’d just been back from foraging, and had a van full of watercress and nettles destined for the dinner the following night for the Slow Food national delegates. Already had 2 shoots booked the following day, but couldn’t not slide by to visit them in

From Local Farms – The Cheesiry

07.13.11

I left the Cheesiry feeling strangely like I’d just visited an old-world producer – and not simply because of the old-school pecorino they produce. There’s a wonderful vibe from the cheesiry being built into the heart of the family farm’s old cow dairy facilities which on a hot day offers a cool and patina’d experience – and stepping into their boutique where Rhonda will guide you through her creations certainly adds to the experience. Having decided at age 30 that it was time for a

Would You Buy This Cheese?

03.20.11

This cheese entered my life as a gift. It’s an aged Bressan from Smoky Valley Goat Cheese, and Holly figured the mottled molds atop it would make it unsuitable for sale. She also claimed that this particular batch was so good that if she kept it for herself, she’d eat yet another lovely wheel of it by herself. I’m no doctor, but I’m wagering she’s right that eating multiple wheels of cheese back-to-back is unlikely to bolster health. So I accepted her gift designed to

My Palate and Sinuses will Recover, Honest.

03.13.11

In 2006, a more than fledgling foodie at the time [and the year I started blogging], my wife and I spent a month traveling through western and eastern Europe, seeking regional food specialties. On that trip, having felt I knew cheese well, I went to France for the half-dozenth time, and had a major cheese awakening. Overall, their cheeses, even their brie de meaux – were raunchy. Barnyard, stinky, rich kind of raunchy. The French must come here, eat our ‘brie’ or ‘camembert’ from the box

Chocolate Espresso Chevrecake

02.11.11

This was an innovative-idea-to-me, but I googled it and apparently others have already discovered it. Oh well. Originality is not my m.o.

Chevrecake. Cheesecake happens to be my all-time-favorite-dessert, and a few years  back I spent some time mucking about with an individual [ramekin] sized chocolate espresso cheesecake recipe that I love dearly. It’s my birthday choice. And having recently discovered how substitutable Holly‘s chevre was for cream cheese when making icing, I figured I must give it another dessert-go via cheesecake.

My

On Building an Urban Cellar

12.30.10

Over the past year or so I’ve been asked by more folks than I anticipated about how to tackle building their own cellar. And the more I find my winter writing heavily dominated by cellar-related adventures, the more I’ve realized that I’ll need to offer a resource about how to actually build a cellar if information about how to put one to use is to be of any value. If you have a home with a basement and live where it gets bloody cold in the

Valencay Epiphany

12.15.10

Well as it turns out, it took me a week or so to get to those brownish, fuzzy, kinda brutal looking Valencays that I aged in my cellar for a couple months. And as it turns out, I was wrong. They were not dead, bad, or past. They were SUBLIME.

The reason I was cellaring these was to see where they go with age – whether there are benefits to the aging, and if so, what they are. Pretty straightforward. When I cut into

Cheese Cellar Porn

12.08.10

You take milk. You make cheese. And you stick it in your cellar for months. Food preservation methods like this astonish me. My cheese cellar is low-tech and passively cooled and humidified. No gear. No electronics. No energy consumption. Old-school. Currently holds 90+% humidity and temp is a bit low at 5-6C.

I took these photos because Holly asked me to. She was curious to see the current state of the microflora my cellar endowed these cheeses with. Both are goat, one her ‘Tomme’,

Goat Cheese Post Mortem

12.07.10

My email this evening to Holly Gale of Smoky Valley Goat Cheese who’s consulting on my cheese cellaring project.

“Finally hit an aging hurdle. These Valencays went in there in mid October, so nearly 2 months. They looked like this when they did. They held up really well until the last week or two.

What’s interesting is that they seem to have dried considerably,  but not softened. And that brown mold simply does not look friendly. I’m going to cut them open to do a post-mortem

Cellaring Cheese

10.20.10

One of my goals this year was to start to get my feet wet at making cheese. I failed. I have not made cheese.

But what has happened is a very happy thing: I’ve become good friends with cheesemaker  Holly Gale and have had the opportunity to help their farm in a variety of ways – in exchange for cheese. All of these cheeses were made by Holly, and are being aged by me [with Holly's consultation] in my cellar. I’m learning that aging cheese can be a dynamic affair, and here are some photos from