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Shaggy Parasols – in November

11.07.10

I don’t quite get it. I must be doing something right.  It’s likely just the year. I not only got a serious feed of these in July, then again in September, but then they came again in…November??? Just to be clear, they’re all from my small city lot, and I didn’t try to grow these – they grow ‘wild’. They actually showed up the end of October, it snowed, froze, I thought they were toast, but then took a look this week and noticed they were hangin’ out, waiting to be picked. Crazy. A few notes to self:

Shaggy parasol caps are AWESOME along with rare pan fried game tenderloin. It’s as if they knew they had to hold on into early November when the game enters our home in droves.

The white granular stuff in my soil that I thought was a result of the previous owners’ dog piss or some other soil disease is apparently mushroom related. They grow where that stuff is.

Drying them is genius. A friend suggested making mushroom stock from dried morels + my freezer is packed + I don’t normally use much of the stem or bulb that is in the soil = I’m drying the stems and small caps + will make mushroom stock with them. Genius.

***Don’t die eating wild mushrooms that you haven’t ID’d and blame it on me. Wild mushrooms can be vile-nasty-toxic, and this is my disclaimer that it’s not my fault if you mess up and get disastrously ill based on the information above. I’m just sayin’.

5 Responses

  1. I just posted a whole bunch of wild mushrooms that are growing on my property on my blog. I’m pretty sure some at the end of the photo series are some shaggy parasols. I found them last year, but was too terrified to eat wild mushrooms. This year, they look a little too soggy and overgrown to be any good.

  2. These were on your city lot? I must pay more attention. We had a lot of mushrooms in our lawns this year but I am too afraid of picking the nasty ones you mention in your disclaimer. I must learn more.

  3. Mel says:

    I’d say you got the late-year boon because of our freakishly warm fall. The ground isn’t frozen yet so those little ‘shrooms must have thought, “hey, we can give it one more shot!”

    As you’ve no doubt noticed, these guys seem to come in two-month increments. If global warming keeps up, maybe you’ll be picking Shaggy Manes in January.

  4. VGC – I checked them out on your site, hope it helps!
    Sarah – Yep. I feel really fortunate to have unknowingly bought a lot with an edible mushroom ‘problem’.
    Mel – agreed re: the warm and long fall. I’m telling you, global warming wouldn’t be all bad. By the time we’re seniors, maybe we WILL be growing vinifera in our back yards.

  5. [...] A friend mentioned using dried morels as a powder, and a light bulb went on. I still had some of these left, not really knowing what to do with them as the stems were woody and the caps a little dry for [...]

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